How to Fix a Broken Window Lock

Do you find yourself locking your doors but not being able to lock the window? This is frustrating and can be unsafe. Luckily, there are things you can do to fix it! But, unfortunately, there are many different reasons for this problem. To get a better idea of what’s wrong with your window locks, read on. 

how to fix a broken window lock

The first thing that could be causing this is a broken spring in the lock mechanism. The second reason could be faulty or worn-out parts in the latch assembly or the door frame itself.

These problems will often happen because of weather extremes such as extreme heat or cold, which can weaken metal-on-metal connections over time and cause them to break down. However, sometimes these parts will break without any influence from the outside. In this article, we’ll explore how to fix a broken window lock.

Step to Follow on How to Fix a Broken Window Lock 

Step One: Identify window lock type

There are three types of window locks: the crank handle lock, double-hung sash lock, and side-mounted sash lock. The only one that has a problem is the crank handle type: it just pulls out so you can get out or in with ease, but it’s straightforward to fix and doesn’t require any tools.

When the crank handle comes out, look at where it’s coming from and push it back in. If you can’t do this, you might have a different type of break, and you’ll need to refer to your user manual or call a professional to get it fixed.

Step Two: Determine Material Type

If your window frame is aluminum, you cannot drill through it, so you must use a screwdriver to remove the broken tip of the broken crank handle. Go into one of the holes that are not stripped and pull out the part that has come loose. If your window frame is vinyl or fiberglass, you can drill into it.

Determine the Material Type

Go into your garage and find a 3/8 drill bit that is slightly larger than the broken crank handle. Drill in the center of where the tip of the crank broke off. Then find a screwdriver and tap into one of the holes, working around until all the screws are loose. Then, carefully pry out the crank handle until you can remove it from the window frame.

Step Three: Get a New Handle

Take your broken crank handle to either Home Depot or Lowes and find an identical replacement for it. Make sure they have the same number of screws around it so that you don’t run into any problems getting it to reattach to the window.

If you did not drill through your vinyl or fiberglass window frame, put the crank handle back in and tighten all of the screws around it. You can use glue on this kind of window frame so that your crank handle is securely in place.

Step Four: Check if There Are Any More Broken Pieces

If you didn’t drill through your window, you should check to ensure all the screws are still in place. If they are not, use a high-strength adhesive to put the screw back into its original space. Put some glue on your vinyl or fiberglass window frame if it’s broken around any of the screws holding the crank handle in.

Make Sure All the Screws Are Still in Place

Let the glue dry and reattach your crank handle. Then, use the following tricks to reattach it securely to your window. If you have a double-hung sash, use a sliding mechanism to reattach the handle. If you don’t have a sliding mechanism, secure the handle by wrapping a solid nylon strap around it and securing that to both sides of your window frame with screws or bolts.

Step Five: Reattach the Window Lock

When putting your window crank back into the window, make sure it is where it was before. If you replace it in a different position, then your broken window will open even further or not at all. Once you have replaced the handle on both sides of the frame, screw them down with medium-strength adhesive.

Repeat the process on all of your windows to make sure that everything is working correctly. If you’re interested in learning more tips on how to fix a broken window lock, continue reading.

Step Six: Ensure Window Lock Works After Reattachment

Your window crank should be exactly where it was before you replaced the broken handle, but if it’s not, then simply move it back into its original position. You should do this before you screw it into place to ensure that the window will still open and close properly.

Ensure Window Lock Works After Reattachment

Roll up your window and turn on your power locks to see if they work. Next, roll down the window and check to see if the crank handle stays in place when you let go of it or if it comes loose quickly. If there’s a problem, you might have put the handle in a different spot when you reattached it or if you used a screw instead of adhesive.

Step Seven: Use an Adhesive

When you are putting on the handle, make sure only to use medium-strength adhesive. If you use too strong of an adhesive, your window will no longer open and close properly. If you used a screw instead of adhesive like before, make sure that there aren’t any screws in the way when you try to roll up or down the window.

Your window lock should now be working after you have completed these steps. Remember that they operate differently on different kinds of windows, so if your double-hung sash operates by sliding the crank handle, make sure to put it behind the sliders so that it will open and close with them.

Conclusion

Even if you don’t have a broken window, steps can be taken to help prevent break-ins. The first step is to make sure your windows and doors are locked at all times when not in use. In addition, always keep curtains or blinds closed while the house is unoccupied, so it’s harder for burglars to see inside from outside. Finally, lock up any valuables too!

Finally, remember to install a good quality deadbolt lock on exterior doors which open into an area where people may gather, such as front entrances or back porches. The conclusion paragraph is informative and provides information on how to fix a broken window lock.

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